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Previous Members

You can find past rotation students at student page.

Gaku Sakaguchi received his PhD from Osaka University. He spent one year as a visiting scientist in Matsuoka’s lab (2003-2004). During this time, Gaku greatly contributed to the sequestration project. He also oversaw other projects and mentored research assistants in the lab. A portion of his work is submitted for publication, and his results will be presented at the International Alzheimer’s disease conference in July 2004. He returned to his position in Japan and remains as an important collaborator. Below is a statement from Gaku:
Hello, I’m Gaku. I worked with Dr.Yasuji for one year. I learned a lot from him: of course, his scientific depth and strategy are attractive. Besides, his great faculty for organization always impressed me. His lab is managed systematically and methodically, which contributed to my training as a director. It’s very important for a young scientist. He is a rare man of foresight not only as a scientist but also as a lab director. The research assistants he selected are extremely efficient and they always supported me with everything I needed. We were a very good team. I had to leave his lab due to my business, but I wanted to stay longer and continue studying and training in his lab.
   
Chiharu Shiratori received her Master’s Degree from South Dakota State University. While at Nathan Kline Institute (2002-2003), working for Matsuoka, she was responsible for analyzing the amount of Abeta in mouse cerebral spinal fluid, plasma, and brain. Her data support the literature produced by Matsuoka, and her efforts influenced the techniques now used in the Matsuoka Lab at Georgetown University. Chiharu moved home to Japan. Below is a statement from Chiharu:
Hi, my name is Chiharu. I used to work as a research assistant in Yasuji's lab. In his lab, I learned not only by pursuing his experiments, but also by studying related research during my free time. Yasuji is a very enthusiastic doctor, and he always encouraged me to learn many experiments. He has a lot of medical and biological knowledge and always has new ideas to find new and different views of Alzheimer's disease treatment. I was really happy to work under Yasuji, and I know my experience in his lab is going to be a big advance for my future.
   

Fumitaka Kato is a medical student at Shiga University for Medical Sciences. He spent summer at Matsuoka lab in 2004. He worked on making animal model of Alzheimer's disease with neuronal cell loss. Below is a statement from Fumitaka.

Hi, my name is Fumitaka. I worked in Yasuji's lab as a summer student for one month. I learned a lot from him, and he was very helpful in teaching me the techniques of each experiment. He first told me the background and science of each technique, and how important it is to find a problem and solve it. When I didn't know what I should do, he and the lab members were very kind in telling me how to continue. I was very glad to study under Yasuji, and my experience in his lab will be useful for my future.
   

Lena Enck, high school student, spent summer at Matsuoka lab in 2004. She worked on stereology-based neuron count.

 

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